Get a top-tier Excel education for less than $50 with these online classes

Learn Excel from the same people who teach Microsoft employees how to use it.

Learn Excel from the same people who teach Microsoft employees how to use it.
Learn Excel from the same people who teach Microsoft employees how to use it. –Stack Commerce

If there is any one program that the vast majority of people have on their resumes, it’s Microsoft Excel. Of course, putting it on a resume and actually understanding it are two different things entirely. Most people know how to use Excel as a spreadsheet program to organize data. But Excel can be so, so much more. When you master Excel, it may just put you on the path to promotion because it helps you accomplish so much, so efficiently. Want to finally learn Excel for real? Check out The 2020 Excel Certification School Bundle by eLearnExcel.

eLearnExcel is a training resource employed by some of the world’s leading companies, like Microsoft, Facebook, Dell, and HSBC. This bundle is led by Fiona Hannon, a training consultant with 24 years of professional experience who has consulted with Microsoft, Allianz, Hibernian, and many more top-tier clients. All of the courses in this bundle are approved by (and used by) Microsoft.

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In this eight-course bundle, you’ll develop basic to advanced skills and knowledge across hands-on projects. You’ll learn time-saving tips, essential formulas and functions, data analysis in Excel, chart creation, how to scale spreadsheets, and more. You’ll even dive into advanced topics like Pivot Tables and VBA, special advanced Excel skills that will help you work with data more efficiently than ever.

By the end of these courses, your Excel expertise should be in the top 1% of Excel users. Enroll in The 2020 Excel Certification School Bundle by eLearnExcel today for just $48.99.

Prices subject to change. Software not included.

 

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