The Best Vermont Foliage Drives

Each route has a link to Google Maps!

Bennington Vermont
Bennington Vermont –Visit New England

By Mary Lhowe

Vermont might be the most legendary of the three northern New England states, as people from around the world pore over pictures of blazing red, orange and gold foliage.  Your drive along Vermont’s river valleys and up the coast or Lake Champlain should include a pass-through at least one of the state’s famous covered bridges. Even though this is not maple-harvest season, there is plenty of maple syrup to buy and enjoy. Find more drives and details about each drive at our Vermont foliage drives page.

SOUTHERN REGION

Manchester to Bennington to Williamstown MA drive – This drive trail in the southwestern corner of Vermont touches the picturesque towns of Bennington and Manchester, and dips briefly into the Massachusetts town of Williamstown. Manchester, VT, has sections of sidewalk paved with marble, and Bennington has art museums and a tall monument with vast views. Route map.

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CENTRAL REGION

Upper Connecticut River Valley Loop — This loop drive in east-central Vermont touches on some of the most beautiful places –natural and man-made – that the state offers. The drive start and terminus is the sweet town of Woodstock. Continuing, this route takes you near some great shopping (Simon Pearce Glass and Plymouth Artisan Cheese), history (Billings Farm), and natural wonder (Quechee Gorge). Route map

NORTHERN REGION

Northeast Kingdom Loop – People who love the pristine outdoors love The Kingdom: Vermont’s remote northeastern corner. Be sure to visit St. Johnsbury, with a wonderful art museum, the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. Also nearby is the unique Dog Mountain – a place that welcomes and celebrates dogs. Jay Peak resort has a fabulous water park; the resort is shouting distance from Canada, with delightful walks and hikes on all sides. Route map.

Provided By Visit New England

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